All Posts, Monday Mantra

Monday Mantra

I stumbled upon a quote yesterday and it really resonated with me and my current writing headspace:

“I don_t wait for moods. You accomplish nothing if you do that. Your mind must know it has got to get down to work.”

There is so much truth packed into this small collection of sentences. ❤

I am learning to stop waiting for the “right” mood or “right” time because I get far more accomplished when I just put butt to chair and pen to paper.

So, in an incredibly short post, I share with you my mantra for today: get down to work.

More to come tomorrow — stay tuned.

 

 

All Posts

Literary Agents

I’ve seen a lot of discussion in my online writing groups regarding literary agents lately. People have been asking what exactly they do, how to find them, and whether they’re even necessary to have, and it really struck me when I realized how many authors were sort of in the dark on this topic.

I’ll admit, I didn’t always understand their full significance myself, but after perusing the Internet and interacting in groups with those who had all the good information on agents, I feel much better about my understanding of their imperative role in an author’s publishing journey.

So exactly does an agent do? Well, their biggest role is to work as a liaison between an author and a publishing house. Most medium to large scale publishing houses will refuse manuscripts that are sent by the actual author – they typically want only works that are sent by agents. If you submit a query to an agent and they agree to take you on as a client, their job is to find a publishing house that fits your manuscript. Different publishers look for different types of submissions, and agents have the insider knowledge that will help them put your work in the right hands.

lit-agents

Now, if we’ve gotten this far and you’re wondering what a query letter is, don’t fret. It is essentially a letter that explains your story in order to capture the attention of the agent. It is a necessary component to acquiring an agent and is an important skill to hone if you wish to take the traditional publishing route. A well composed query letter also makes you stand out professionally and can give a great first impression with a kick of additional credibility. If an agent can see that you are serious and able to construct a well thought out letter, they will have more faith in you and your manuscript, provided the story stands out to them as well.

More information on drafting a killer query letter can be found at http://nybookeditors.com/2015/12/how-to-write-a-darn-good-query-letter/.

Of course, it is important to find an agent you’d like to submit to, or even a few of them, before you can get much further in the process. While there are many routes to take and plenty of agent directories online, you’ll want to make sure that the agents you’re looking into are legit, and a quick search of the Association of Author Representatives can help as well as taking a look at client lists.

Two directories I recommend include:

By now, you can probably gather that finding an agent to represent you is necessary if you plan to take the traditional publishing route. If you self-publish, it isn’t as necessary, and if you are planning to submit to smaller, regional publishing houses, they aren’t as much of a requirement either. But a trusted agent can definitely guide you in the right direction if you plan to submit to larger publishers.

Here are a few more links with great information on literary agents:

http://www.dailywritingtips.com/how-to-find-a-literary-agent/

http://www.independentpublisher.com/article.php?page=1586

http://ingridsundberg.com/2010/04/15/the-dos-and-donts-of-submitting-to-a-literary-agent/

I hope you found this helpful, and if you have anything add, whether it’s advice, recommendations, or additional information, please leave a comment! I only scratched the surface here and would love more feedback from those who have gone through the process. 🙂

 

All Posts, Dreamweaver, My Writing

Sneak Peek #1

Decided to give a little sneak peek since I finally accomplished a fairly large hurdle with this novel! The image below is only a mock-up of a cover I made for my NaNoWriMo page, but I finally have a TITLE! I sort of knew all along that I’d come back to this one, but I wanted to explore a few other options first. At the end of the day, this one just fits best with the story.

I’m planning for sneak peek #2, which will be an excerpt from the novel itself, around Christmas, so stay tuned! And, as always, thank you to everyone who has been so supportive of me in this endeavor.  🙂

dreamweaver-2

All Posts, My Writing, Thursday Thoughts

When the Going Gets Tough…

Writing is hard.

I’ve spent two weeks filling a notebook with ideas and then sitting down at my computer only to get back up again because I just didn’t feel ready; my headspace wasn’t where it needed to be.

A lot of people, upon asking what I do for a living, say things like, “Oh, that must be fun!” or, “I’ve always wanted to do that!” and I kind of sit back and say to myself, ‘You know, it is fun, but it’s a damn challenge, too.’

I try to ignore the comments because I feel they sort of discredit what I’ve set out to accomplish. Yes, anyone can write, but I get a bit sensitive when someone mentions writing like a bucket list item. That’s my deal though, and I’m trying not to let it get to me as much, especially since a lot of those people aren’t intending to come across the way I take it.

But sometimes it truly is hard to get around those comments because writing is so hard. You can literally sit and pour hours into a piece only to hit the delete button because it just wasn’t coming together and no amount of editing could save it, pour your heart out onto a page only to question whether anyone will care about what you’re trying to say, and pour your soul into something that you might never see a return on but know that you need to finish it anyway.

On top of the time spent and the amount of yourself you pour into your work, you also have to believe it’s worthwhile. You have to have some semblance of faith in your decision to take this art and craft it into a tangible career prospect because without that faith, it becomes hard to keep pushing.

Because writing is hard.

It’s long hours and not-long-enough days, deadlines and self-discipline, procrastination and stress. It’s research and fact-checking, editing and revising, criticism and constructive feedback. It’s hard work, dedication, rejection, and perseverance. And it takes heart and soul.

Writing is hard because every word you put on a piece of paper or type into a processor is a part of who you are, and I know that for me, I want every word I publish to the world to be composed the right way. I want it to provide the correct and most authentic message, present my genuine voice, and share my ideas in a way I can be proud of.

My greatest fear as a writer is that I’ll embarrass myself somehow or damage my own credibility, or even force something to the point that it no longer reflects who I am. The amount of work that goes into this craft far surpasses simply putting words to a page and is the reason I respect anyone who sets out to make a career out of it.

Despite the drawbacks and seemingly negative aspects, I wouldn’t change my decision to shape my career around writing. It has given me so much more than I could imagine with any other pursuit and at the end of the day, it is my greatest strength and the one thing I know I can make a difference with.

I am definitely not the greatest, nor will I ever come close, but I do hope that I can make an impact in at least one person’s life with what I have to say. And that hope is what helps to keep me going, along with my faith and the fact that I’m not really living unless I’m creating art with my words. It’s how I make sense of the world around me and understand myself in relation to the world, and without it, I would be absolutely lost.

It’s hard, but so worth it.